These forums are an Archive of the Live Forums at biodieseldiscussion.com on 11/26/2008.
These Archive Forums are read only. New registrations and posts are not allowed. To participate in live forums go Here
 



Go Back   Biodiesel & SVO Discussion Forums Archive - Live Forums at biodieseldiscussion.com > Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) as Fuel > General SVO Discussion

General SVO Discussion Description

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-03-2006, 03:43 AM
Matthew Hall Matthew Hall is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Copperhead Road
Posts: 118
Default

Does anyone know if there would be a compatibility issue if I used a polypropylene or polyethylene (low density/high density?) tank to hold a blend containing 90% WVO, 9% diesel fuel, and 1% Power Service? I did find this on a plastic tank company's site:

Q. Are plastic tanks more chemical-resistant than stainless or alloy steel tanks?

A. Plastic tanks, specifically polypropylene plastic tanks, are compatible with alkaline
solutions, mineral oils, amines, jet fuel (JP3, 4, 5), and hydrogen peroxide, plus common
acids including hydrochloric (20%), maleic, nitric (50%) and phosphoric.

Jet fuels are basically the same as diesel and kerosene correct?
  #2  
Old 01-03-2006, 03:43 AM
Matthew Hall Matthew Hall is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Copperhead Road
Posts: 118
Default

Does anyone know if there would be a compatibility issue if I used a polypropylene or polyethylene (low density/high density?) tank to hold a blend containing 90% WVO, 9% diesel fuel, and 1% Power Service? I did find this on a plastic tank company's site:

Q. Are plastic tanks more chemical-resistant than stainless or alloy steel tanks?

A. Plastic tanks, specifically polypropylene plastic tanks, are compatible with alkaline
solutions, mineral oils, amines, jet fuel (JP3, 4, 5), and hydrogen peroxide, plus common
acids including hydrochloric (20%), maleic, nitric (50%) and phosphoric.

Jet fuels are basically the same as diesel and kerosene correct?
  #3  
Old 01-03-2006, 09:11 AM
Todd T Todd T is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: El Dorado, Ark
Posts: 860
Default

Pretty much.... jet fuel, diesel, kerosene... all in the same family.

In my research on the chemical compatability charts, I find vegetable oil isn't mentioned. Is it because veggie is so mild that the manufacturers just don't test it? Or is it that there just aren't that many applications where folks are wanting to store waste vegetable oil? And, of those, how many want to do it at elevated temperatures? These chemical compatability charts have been around for years whereas our use of heated WVO as a fuel is relatively new.

Biodiesel is such a new product that most don't address it. So, I look for similar products. D-Limonene is a fruit based solvent extract made from oranges. As a solvent, it has just a little less cutting power than biodiesel. Naphtha has a bit more solvency.

What I find is a mixed bag, though. One chart will show a material as questionable for a milder product but able to hold a stronger ingredient.

One suggestion, check for methyl soyate... another chemical name for biodiesel.

I'm just a bit nervous about using any plastic for a storage container, though. Aluminum and stainless steel are more proven.

Todd T
__________________
2002 F-250, 7.3l PSD on grease since 2004
  #4  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:28 AM
Friar Fewell Friar Fewell is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 82
Default

To set your mind at ease you might try comparing PETE compatibility with that of polypropylene or polyethylene. Strore-bought vege oil bottles are typically made of PETE. Also, consider that portable gas/diesel storage containers are HDPE.
__________________
1992 Dodge Cummins (WVO conversion in progress)
  #5  
Old 01-03-2006, 11:24 AM
Joe_M Joe_M is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Sterling Hts. Michigan USA
Posts: 1,979
Default

The cubees that veg oil comes in is HDPE as well.
__________________
Blessings. Joe 1999 Chevy Suburban 6.5L TD 1987 Mercedes 300TD and 1986 Chevy Cube van 6.2L.
[COLOR:RED]WWW.RillaBioFuels.com[/color]
WWW.RillaBioFuels.com
  #6  
Old 01-03-2006, 01:34 PM
Todd T Todd T is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: El Dorado, Ark
Posts: 860
Default

I haven't found anything that hurts HDPE. When in doubt, go with HDPE (high density poly ethylene).

Todd T
__________________
2002 F-250, 7.3l PSD on grease since 2004
  #7  
Old 01-03-2006, 03:59 PM
Homestead Homestead is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Ashfield, MA USA
Posts: 39
Default

I didn't think biodiesel attached polyethylene until a few weeks ago. I stored B-100 in a WEDCo brand poly diesel fuel container, the yellow type. There is a spout in this older jug made of a waxy yellow plastic, formed in a spout with the pleats like a bendy straw. This winter the biodiesel had eaten through each of the pleats at the inside edge, where the plastic is the thinnest. I also had made some floats for my floating draw-offs for some fuel tanks. The float is made of expanded polyethylene, the kind that is used in the waxy packing foam material around expensive computers. This is NOT the styrofoam material. Pulling out my floats this winter, I see that the originally square edged block is now eroded to a rounded blob of foam. I guess I've lost about 5% of the foam volume in two years. Anyone else have these types of experiences?

Tom Leue
__________________
www.yellowbiodiesel.com
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.