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JojoJaro
08-19-2006, 04:03 AM
Folks,

I made some glycerine soap but after a week, it would not harden. So I mixed it in with water and washed my car.

This stuff works better than the commercial bottle soap I bought for my car. It seems to remove bug stains better. Works great with wheels also. It removes grease, tar and other oily stuff on the wheels. I've never seen my wheels this clean before.

Any danger with this soap with car paint??? Will this stuff eat car paint?? Just to be sure, I rinsed it more thoroughly than normal.

Jojo

JojoJaro
08-19-2006, 04:03 AM
Folks,

I made some glycerine soap but after a week, it would not harden. So I mixed it in with water and washed my car.

This stuff works better than the commercial bottle soap I bought for my car. It seems to remove bug stains better. Works great with wheels also. It removes grease, tar and other oily stuff on the wheels. I've never seen my wheels this clean before.

Any danger with this soap with car paint??? Will this stuff eat car paint?? Just to be sure, I rinsed it more thoroughly than normal.

Jojo

Legal Eagle
08-19-2006, 08:45 AM
I am assuming you removed the methanol ? I am also assuming that you let the soap "cure" for a couple weeks before using it ? No problem, or at least no greater problem than any other soap would produce.
One more constructive use for the glycerine by-product, yea! This may yet prove to be amongst the better ones too. Once thoroughly tested so that no ill effects on paint are evident then there is a definitive commercial possibililty here.

tesseract
08-23-2006, 11:25 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JojoJaro:
Folks,

I made some glycerine soap but after a week, it would not harden. So I mixed it in with water and washed my car.
...
Any danger with this soap with car paint??? Will this stuff eat car paint?? Just to be sure, I rinsed it more thoroughly than normal.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Don't know if this applies to glycerin soap, but with regular soaps (ie - made from fatty acids), potassium soaps are liquids while sodium soaps are solids.

Pure glycerin MAY dissolve automotive paint, much like brake fluid, but diluted with water it shouldn't have a chance. 'Course, the time to be asking this sort of question is BEFORE you douse your car with the stuff, not after http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Seriously - the best test would be to try applying some glycerin to a hidden spot of paint on your car and see if it softens it up.

Jim D
08-24-2006, 01:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Seriously - the best test would be to try applying some glycerin to a hidden spot of paint on your car and see if it softens it up. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Or apply it to a car in a junkyard or such. The guy that I've taken several cars to for body work always has a scrap body panel hanging around. Find someone like him and put some on a junk/scrap panel.

-Jim

JojoJaro
09-16-2006, 11:02 PM
Folks,

I washed Maybelyn again and Vinny with Glycerine made soap. No noticeable paint degradation. I will continue to do this until I find some paint degradation. I am not expecting any.

Anyways, I noticed that with Glycerine soap, that there are no water spots when it dries. Interesting, cause I expected to find water spots. My water normally leaves water spots. Instead, it just leaves the paint squeaky (literally squeaky) clean; and shinny.

My theory is that, the glycerine soap leaves the paint so clean and free of any oils that the water does not form beads on it as it dries. If the water does not bead, then it should not dry as water spots.

This glycerine made soap is turning out to be one extremely useful all around cleaner.


Jojo

Legal Eagle
09-17-2006, 03:24 AM
Yup! I've washed my Benz with my "dish soap" twice now and it works great !

Tiger744
09-17-2006, 12:18 PM
Could i please have your recipe for making this glyc soap? My Truck needs washing real bad..lol

Legal Eagle
09-17-2006, 04:51 PM
Depending on the feedstock's viscocity once it is reduced to the by-product you first recover the methanol and then while it is still liquid do a 50/50 glyc water mix, but in the water disolve 40gr/Lt water first.
The process will tolerate more water if you want it more flowing.2Lt water to 1.5Lt glyc works equally well.
I have used canola to make mine as it was giving me no end of trouble in making a hard bar soap out of. I make bar soap out of the prtly hydrogenated sstuff and leave the canola for liquid soap, all using NaOH as the catalyst.

Wayne Seymour
11-29-2006, 04:50 AM
Maybe I'm being foolish here, but I have used glycerine many times for washing my truck without first making it into soap. I don't know what gave me the idea, but I tried some on a small place in the bed of my pickup where WVO had hardened and nothing short of acetone would touch it. I figured glycerine, even with some methanol in it was better then acetone, so I tried a little and it worked great! Then I tried diluting it 50% with water, and it still worked. I've since washed the whole truck with it many times over probably 9 months now and don't see any ill effects at all.

Of course, it may react differently with different paints. Has anyone else tried this?

Oh yeah, I've since used it straight to degrease my engine to find an oil leak, and to clean the cement floor around my processor.

CarGuy
11-29-2006, 04:35 PM
Yes, the dish soap works awesome for washing cars, but it takes the wax coat off! So it might be an idea to reapply a coat of wax to protect your clear coat from fine scratches. I work part time in a body shop, and I am quite happy with the results so far. Normally to take the wax coat off cars we work on, we have use harsh cancer-causing solvents! This stuff is way safer to your health and the price can't be beat either!

Daniel

BioD_RnD
11-30-2006, 11:46 AM
I'm not surprised that if it removes the oil well, it'll remove the wax layer. What is wax other than solid oils? (More or less, I know there's more to it, but that's it for all intents and purposes.)

Seriously, I've not tried the glycerol soap I'm working on, which I'm going liquid because it'll be easiest to use around the plant, on any of the machines but I can't wait to try. Is it useable on practically any metal, because a friend wants to take a bit home to try and clean her stainless steel oven.

Legal Eagle
11-30-2006, 09:01 PM
We have several stainless steel pots ect and it cleans 'em up real well.

BobAbbey
12-01-2006, 02:52 AM
If I use KOH in my process, giving me liquid glycerol by product, what should I use for the soap making process? KOH or NAOH?

I don't expect that I can make bar soap from my KOH by product, but I am very interested in the liquid varieties mentioned here.

I am thinking that the soap can be made with either caustic, but with different personalities. How would that affect different applications?

Could a commercial car wash be supplied with our concoction? They won’t care what color it is!

Still thinkin’….

Bob